Texas Cooperative Extension, Texas A&M University System
Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University

Class Chilopoda and Diplopoda

 

Centipedes can easily be distinguished from millipedes by counting the number of pairs of legs arising from most body segments: millipedes have two pairs, while centipedes bear one pair per segment, with the first pair of legs being modified into fangs. Centipedes are generally flattened and have a pair of well developed antennae on the head.

See Diplopoda and Chilopoda.

 

 

 
A centipede, Scolopendra sp.  Photo by Drees.
Click on image to enlarge
A centipede,
Scolopendra
sp.
(Chilopoda Scolopendromorpha:
Scolopendridae).
Photo by Drees.
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From the book:
Field Guide to Texas Insects,
Drees, B.M. and John Jackman,
Copyright 1999, Gulf Publishing Company,
Houston, Texas

A Field Guide to Common Texas Insects, Bastiaan M. Drees and John A. Jackman.
Texas A&M University
Texas A&M University •  Department of Entomology  •  412 Heep Center, TAMU 2475
College Station, TX 77843-2475 • 979.845.2516
Department of Entomology at Texas A&M University